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Related Categories: California | Central Valley | Government & Elections | Racial Justice
California African American Heritage on display at Sutter's Fort State Historic Park
by Khubaka, Michael Harris
Sunday May 7th, 2017 12:15 AM
People of African ancestry provided the financial venture capital, cooks , barrel making and much, much more. Our “hidden figures” await legal statutory authority to facilitate sharing the story daily as part of an inclusive content of the authentic California Gold Rush Experience. The legacy of Honorable William Alexander Leidesdorff, Jr. will open the archives of "hidden figures" of Black Agriculture along the American River Parkway, ( 1840 -1875 ) to stimulate a new conversation of valuing inclusion and equity throughout the 100 billion dollar plus, California Agriculture industries.
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Sutter’s Fort State Historic Park fun and interactive “Hands on History” continues to explore including California African American Heritage to regular daily activities. Black Agriculture at Sutter’s Fort will showcase our regional contributions during early California History (1840 – 1875)

On Saturday, May 20, 2017, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Fort visitors will be amazed to appreciate the important role Black Agriculture played in California’s early development. Sacramento shares an amazing historical regional "Farm-to-Fork Capitol of America" legacy part of the “California Grown” experience. .

Today, Sutter’s Fort guests will learn a growing focus on seasonal and locally sourced production agriculture was an essential part of our African American Heritage along the American River Parkway in Gold Rush California.

When John Sutter first arrived in California in 1839, his dream to build an agricultural empire was supported in so many ways by people of Hawaiian, Native American and African ancestry.

People of African ancestry provided the financial venture capital, cooks , barrel making and much, much more. Our “hidden figures” await legal statutory authority to facilitate sharing the story daily as part of an inclusive content of the authentic California Gold Rush Experience.

Today’s California’s agricultural industry is poised to consider “farmer equity” utilizing leadership by people of African ancestry to help expand the reach of our breadbasket to the world, mirroring the actual scene on our California State Seal, sharing a tradition of excellence and inclusion.

At this special “Hands on History” event, visitors will learn about how and where early wheat production occurred. Wheat was threshed and winnowed at the Sutter’s Fort and help lead to the creation of the first global wheat market in the California Central Valley.

The California Gold Rush Era sparked today’s global farm to fork movement, a local regional agriculture production model that was seasonal, creating expanded international market opportunities first explored by the “African Founding Father of California” at his 35,500 acre Rancho Rio De Los Americanos cattle and wheat agribusiness operation.

“Hands on History” activities are included in the cost of admission. Sutter’s Fort SHP admission: $7 per adult (18 and older), $5 per youth (ages 6 to 17) and free for children 5 and under. For more information about Black Agriculture at Sutter’s Fort, call 916-997-2451 or visit http://www.suttersfort.org

California State Parks Mission
To provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high quality outdoor recreation.